Basalt Rifles

Ask me anything   Fighting crime,
In a future time

flowersam:

you ever look at a kink and think “nah” then a few years later look at the same kink and go “actually yes”

(via isei-silva)

— 3 hours ago with 10447 notes
#sometimes 

jaclcfrost:

[slams fist down on the table] who gave your voice permission to sound that attractive

(via anonymouslyninja)

— 5 hours ago with 130385 notes
Hannibal season 2 finale

lactobacille:

Chilton shows up 4 episodes late with a starbucks

image

(via vesiel)

— 5 hours ago with 968 notes
the-female-soldier:

Agustina de Aragón was a heroine of the Spanish War of Independence and the Peninsular War against France. She is most famous for her bravery at the Siege of Zaragoza.
In 1808, Zaragoza was one of the last cities in northern Spain not to have fallen to the forces of Napoleon and was ill-prepared for a siege. Agustina, a civiilian at the time, was present during the French attack of the Portillo gateway. Broken by the French onslaught, the Spanish began to retreat. With the French troops just a few yards away, Agustina ran forward, loaded a cannon and lit the fuse, shredding a wave of attackers at point blank range. Inspired by her act of bravery, the Spanish forces rallied and assisted her in repelling the attackers.
While this heroic defense bought time for Zaragoza, the siege was only broken for a matter of weeks, after which the French returned and this time were successful in taking the city. Agustina was captured and saw her own son killed by French guards. She later mounted a daring escape and became a low-level rebel leader for the guerrilleros, harassing the French with hit-and-run raids.
Her forces joined the alliance against the French led by the Duke of Wellington. The only female officer in Wellington’s army, Agustina eventually rose to the rank of Captain and acted as a front line battery commander at the Battle of Vitoria, which led to the French being driven out of Spain. 
Following the war she married and later in life became a familiar sight in Zaragoza as a respectable old lady wearing medals. She died in 1857 aged 71.
[Read more]

the-female-soldier:

Agustina de Aragón was a heroine of the Spanish War of Independence and the Peninsular War against France. She is most famous for her bravery at the Siege of Zaragoza.

In 1808, Zaragoza was one of the last cities in northern Spain not to have fallen to the forces of Napoleon and was ill-prepared for a siege. Agustina, a civiilian at the time, was present during the French attack of the Portillo gateway. Broken by the French onslaught, the Spanish began to retreat. With the French troops just a few yards away, Agustina ran forward, loaded a cannon and lit the fuse, shredding a wave of attackers at point blank range. Inspired by her act of bravery, the Spanish forces rallied and assisted her in repelling the attackers.

While this heroic defense bought time for Zaragoza, the siege was only broken for a matter of weeks, after which the French returned and this time were successful in taking the city. Agustina was captured and saw her own son killed by French guards. She later mounted a daring escape and became a low-level rebel leader for the guerrilleros, harassing the French with hit-and-run raids.

Her forces joined the alliance against the French led by the Duke of Wellington. The only female officer in Wellington’s army, Agustina eventually rose to the rank of Captain and acted as a front line battery commander at the Battle of Vitoria, which led to the French being driven out of Spain. 

Following the war she married and later in life became a familiar sight in Zaragoza as a respectable old lady wearing medals. She died in 1857 aged 71.

[Read more]

(via viktor-sbor)

— 14 hours ago with 331 notes
#dream girl 

nentindo:

kidshade:

ediebrit:

IM FUCKING SCREAMING

IM IN FUCKING STITCHES 

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the only thing funnier than this video are the comments on it

(via anonymouslyninja)

— 16 hours ago with 69086 notes
#the fact they consider themselves betas though  #betas aren't losers  #omegas more like  #rant done 
"Experience is a brutal teacher, but you learn. My God, do you learn."
CS Lewis  (via maimedlion)

(Source: detectivelamontagne, via nextsummersseeds)

— 17 hours ago with 308 notes

krocatoo:

Having to google internet slang your friend is using because you have no idea what the fuck it means.

image

(via shithowdy)

— 17 hours ago with 40558 notes
#me 

bblackwidow:

bblackwidow:

how did steve and nat walk around that mall with just a hoodie and not get recognized i mean if i was in that mall i would have been like “do you smell that? i smell freedom. i smell steve rogers”

[eagle screeches in the background]

(Source: bblackwidow, via anonymouslyninja)

— 17 hours ago with 23843 notes

beboqueen:

“Hello,” she said in a voice so husky it could pull a dogsled.

(Source: gynocologist, via anonymouslyninja)

— 17 hours ago with 149959 notes

asylum-art:

Incredible Photography by Sathis Ragavendran

on Flickr

from Maha Shivaratri festival, Angalamman Temple, Kaveripattinam. gaken during “The Mayana Soora Thiruvizha” festival takes place every March in the small village of Kaveripattinam the day after Mahashivarathiri (The great night of Shiva). The festival is devoted to Angalamman, a fierce guardian deity worshipped widely in Southern India.

(via tinyshell)

— 1 day ago with 866 notes
#inspiration  #people 

art-of-swords:

Short Sword

  • Dated: circa 1530 — 1540
  • Culture: South German or Swiss
  • Medium: steel, leather
  • Measurements: overall length,78.6 cm; grup length, 8.2 cm; blade length, 65.3 cm, quillons width, 18.6 cm; weight, 1.5 kg

The form of the guards of this sword is typically South German of the second quarter of the 16th century, but the pommel is as distinctively Venetian while its blade bears the mark of Basle. It seems that such marks stamped upon blades do not refer to its place of origin of the blade, but of the hilt in which it is mounted. Therefore it seems to be reasonable to assume that this sword is, basically, Swiss, though it has the appearance of a hybrid.

A particularly fine sword with a similar guard is in Rome, in the Odescalchi Collection, Mu. no. 185. This is illustrated in Nolfo di Carpegna’s catalogue of its collection, and in Boccia and Coelho’s ‘Nemi Bianche Italiane’, no. 381. A sword with an almost identical pommel and similar guards was sold by the Galerie Helbing in Madrid in 1908, from which sale some of the Medieval swords in the Fitzwilliam Collection came.

The pommel has the form of a crown of three fleusons, the middle on a long truncated cone accommodating the top of the long, which is switched over without a button. The sword features a half-basket guard of four elements of flat triangular section. The knuckle-guard is turned over at the top, the loop-guard covering the back of the hand, springing from the top of the knuckle-guard and meeting the midpoint of a forward ring-guard. Between these two guards is an S-shaped counter-guard. 

The sword has a straight quillons of the same flat triangular section as the guards. The quillons widens toward the tips, which are cut off straight and finished with small spherical knobs. The back-guard is made of one bar, springing from the root of the outside quillon and joining the end of a single short outside branch.

The grip is of oval section, widening toward the pommel, covered in red-brown leather. The broad back-edged blade, with a shallow fuller just inside the back edge which ends in a short cusp at the point. The back is very slightly curved. The blade bears its stamped mark of the City of Basle.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

— 1 day ago with 762 notes
#inspiration  #swords 

deprincessed:

Each designer has a signature piece which represents their whole aesthetic, and in my mind this corset from Alexander McQueen Fall/Winter 1996 is quintessentially everything that Lee stood for. The lilac silk faille corset was covered in a web of black lace and embroidered with beads, inspired by the Victorian age (it was symbolic for mourning) as many of McQueen’s earlier pieces were. Its sharp high neck obstructed the view of the model and had a look as if it belonged to the villain of some twisted fairytale, making the piece raw and unapologetic, but also added a kind of melancholy. This piece is alluring but not particulary conventionally beautiful, which is one of the things that I admire about McQueen’s work; he has this innate ability to find beauty even in the darkest of places, to give ugliness a new kind of attraction. This artistic eye lead McQueen to create an unmatched legacy of haunting collections that will go down in history. image via.

(via quillery)

— 1 day ago with 2864 notes
#fashion